Arizona Wage Increase Hits Construction Security

By Daniel Langhorne | Arizona, Security, Surveillance | No Comments

Arizona Businesses and Security After Minimum Wage Increase

With the Arizona Supreme Court’s ruling earlier this month to uphold voter-approved minimum wage hikes and guarantees for paid sick leave, Arizona business owners should expect an increasingly expensive workforce. Among the decisions ahead of them is how to secure their job sites within budget. There are a few strategies that can help businesses during this search.

Prioritize staffing schedules

Business owners may realize that having on-site security guards every night is unaffordable. One concession to consider is to cut evening patrols to Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays. Thieves take advantage of employees’ extended absence during weekends to make off with valuable items.

There is also the option to cut back service during winter months to make sure the more active summer months are fully staffed.

Smaller security staff

If your security plan includes multiple security guards, you may want to consider cutting the number of guards at your property. This could be a choice between monitoring the entrances and exits, patrolling the permitted, and keeping track of your employees.

Introducing surveillance technology

Keeping Arizona’s ever-increasing minimum wage in mind, an effective strategy for lower security costs is installing remotely monitored cameras. By monitoring cameras live from a central command center business owners can have the security they expect from an onsite guard for a fraction of the price.
It’s important to remember that the 2017 Arizona minimum wage increase is just the beginning.

Here’s a breakdown of the rollout for these minimum wage increases:

AZ Minimum Wage Increase

Jan. 1, 2017: Wage increases to $10 per hour from $8.05 per hour

Jan. 1, 2018: Increases to $10.50 per hour

Jan. 1, 2019: Increases to $11.00 per hour

Jan. 1, 2020: Increases to $12.00 per hour

Jan. 1, 2021: Increases each year by the cost of living index

The minimum wage increase is just half of the ballot measure approved by Arizona voters in Novembers. It also requires employers to guarantee paid sick time. Starting July 1, employers with 15 or more employees must annually pay for 40 hours of sick time and employers with less than 15 employees must pay for 24 hours of sick time.

It’s important to prepare for these changes in the workforce today because the added cost of Arizona’s increasing minimum wage will only continue to grow.

See if you can save money on security

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